Arts  Health  

Wildlife, The Environment And The Casualties Of War

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For decades, Afghanistan has been one of the most war-torn places on Earth. Evolutionary biologist Alex Dehgan has dedicated his career to protecting the country’s unique environment and wildlife population from human destruction, and he joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the effect that war has on an area’s natural landscape. His new book is called “The Snow Leopard Project: And Other Adventures in Warzone Conservation” (PublicAffairs).

Arts  Health  

Talking About A Woman’s Gender Won’t Get Her Elected

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Democratic candidates are already positioning themselves as challengers to President Trump in 2020. And the field is led by a number of high-profile women, including senators Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand and Amy Klobuchar. Linda Hirshman joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the sexism surrounding our conversation about the electability of female candidates, which she writes about for the Washington Post.

Arts  Health  

For A Better Life, Think About Dying

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Most of us plan for the ends of our lives by just putting the idea out of our minds. Katy Butler joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how we can better manage our later years and maintain a high quality of living even at the end. Her new book is called “The Art of Dying Well: A Practical Guide to a Good End of Life” (Scribner).

Arts  Health  

To Fix The House, Add More Reps

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One thing every American can agree on is that we’re living in a particularly divided political landscape. Daily Beast columnist Michael Tomasky joins host Krys Boyd to talk about ideas that might bridge the gap – from ranked-choice voting to at-large congressional districts. His new book is called“If We Can Keep It: How the Republic Collapsed and How it Might Be Saved”(Liveright).

Arts  Health  

What You Don’t Know About Marie Kondo

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Marie Kondo has been equal parts sensation and curiosity with her book on organizing and subsequent Netflix series. Margaret Dilloway grew up with one Asian parent and one white parent, and she joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how Shinto beliefs influenced Kondo – and about what it’s like to see the Kondo phenomenon from two perspectives. Her essay“What White, Western Audiences Don’t Understand About Marie Kondo’s ‘Tidying Up’”appears in The Huffington Post.

Arts  Health  

A Century Of Protest Songs

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Protest songs are arguably most closely associated with the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War. James Sullivan joins host Krys Boyd to trace the evolution of these songs – from the early days of World War I to the present, which he writes about in“Which Side Are You On? 20th Century American History in 100 Protest Songs”(Oxford University Press).

Arts  Health  

The General And The Hurricane

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Lt. General Russel Honoré served as commander of Joint Task Force Katrina, leading his home state of Louisiana’s effort to rise above the devastation. He joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how his military training prepared him to tackle a natural disaster – and about how governments and organizations can be better prepared to handle emergencies.

Arts  Health  

The Roadblock To Medicare-for-All

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Medicare-For-All has turned into a litmus test for Democrats throwing their hats into the 2020 presidential election. Dylan Scott joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the biggest roadblock to expanding Medicare: the 160 million Americans who receive insurance through their jobs. His story“Is Employer-Sponsored Insurance Really a Good Deal for Workers?”appears on Vox.

Arts  Health  

Are Facebook Friends Really Friends?

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This month, Facebook marks its 15th anniversary. Julie Beck joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how the social network has changed the way we view friendship – and about how we now hold onto friendships long past their expiration date. Her essay “Facebook: Where Friendships Go to Never Quite Die” appears on the website of The Atlantic.

Arts  Health  

The Evolution Of Human Violence

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Over the past 250 million years, humans have actually become nicer to one another on an individual level. At the same time, we’ve gotten a lot better at fighting on a grand scale. Harvard anthropologist Richard Wrangham joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the evolution of human violence, which he writes about in“The Goodness Paradox: The Strange Relationship Between Virtue and Violence in Human Evolution”(Pantheon).

Arts  Health  

What The Ganges Means To India

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The Ganges River flows more than 1,500 miles – from the Himalayas to the Bay of Bengal. University of California, Davis history professor Sudipta Sen joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the religious significance the river holds for Hindus – and the lifeline it provides to millions living in India. His new book is called “Ganges: The Many Pasts of an Indian River” (Yale University Press).

Arts  Health  

The Marijauna Smoke Screen

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Recreational marijuana is legal in nine states and the District of Columbia. As more states debate its availability, Alex Berenson joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the pluses and minuses of ending the prohibition on pot. His new book is called“Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence”(Free Press).

Arts  Health  

Why Kids Draw – And Why They Stop

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Drawing is one of the first artistic experiences that many children will have. Arts educator Marilyn JS Goodman joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how drawing evolves as kids develop mentally and physically, which she writes about in“Children Draw: A Guide to Why, When and How Children Make Art”(University of Chicago Press).

Arts  Health  

‘Everyone Thinks I’m A Girl, Mama – And I’m Not’

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When Jodie Patterson began to understand that the child she named Penelope actually identified as a boy, she was forced to rethink everything she thought she knew about gender and identity. She joins host Krys Boyd to talk about what it took for her family to evolve to understand Penelope’s place in it, which she writes about in“The Bold World: A Memoir of Family and Transformation”(Ballantine Books).

Arts  Health  

Women Couldn’t Fight (But Went To War Anyway)

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Beginning in World War I, the American military began sending young women overseas to boost the morale of personnel on the frontlines. Kara Dixon Vuic, professor of war, conflict and society in 20th Century America at TCU, joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk about the roles these women served through the Vietnam War and beyond. Her new book is called“The Girls Next Door: Bringing the Home Front to the Front Lines”(Harvard University Press).

Arts  Health  

A Conversation With Judy Woodruff

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For more than 20 years, Judy Woodruff has anchored PBS Newshour, public television’s signature news program. She joins host Krys Boyd to talk about her more than 40 years in the business – and about Newshour’s place in an increasingly fractured media landscape.

Arts  Health  

America Was Built By Black Labor

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African Americans have been an economic force for 400 years – first working on plantations and later as part of the paid workforce. Joe William Trotter, Jr., director of the Center forAfricanamerican Urban Studies and the Economyat Carnegie Mellon University, joins host Krys Boyd to trace the history of black employment, which he writes about in“Workers on Arrival: Black Labor in the Making of America”(University of California Press).

Arts  Health  

How Much Do You Need To Know To Vote?

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More than 130 million votes were cast in the 2016 election – a number so large that some Americans feel their individual vote doesn’t really matter. George Mason University law professor Ilya Somin studies voter participation, and he joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the danger of willful voter ignorance and how it plays into elections.

Arts  Health  

Should We Negotiate With Terrorists

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In 2012, ISIS began capturing journalists and aid workers in Syria. The governments of Germany, Denmark, France and Italy negotiated to free their hostages. The U.S. and U.K. did not, and theirs were executed. Joel Simon, executive director of the Committee to Protect Journalists, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about working through dozens of these impossible cases. His new book is called“We Want to Negotiate: The Secret World of Kidnapping, Hostages and Ransom”(Columbia Global Reports).

Arts  Health  

Stereotypes As Keepsakes

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From Aunt Jemima to Bugs Bunny in blackface, Americans have been exposed to racist depictions of African Americans since the advent of popular culture. Chico Colvard joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the physical embodiments of these stereotypes, the subject of his Independent Lens documentary“Black Memorabilia,”which airs tonight on public television stations.

Arts  Health  

Known Unknowns: Learning When You’re Wrong

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One of the trickiest elements of learning – the thing no one wants to confront – is the realization that sometimes what we think we know is actually incorrect. Brian Resnick joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how stubbornness stands in the way of scientific advancements. His essay “Intellectual Humility: The Importance of Knowing You Might be Wrong”appears on Vox.

Arts  Health  

Fat Shaming Hurts Men, Too

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When he was 50 years old, Tommy Tomlinson weighed 460 pounds, putting him at risk for heart disease, diabetes and plenty of other ailments. He joins host Krys Boyd to talk about his lifelong battle with weight – and about what it’s like to move through the world constantly aware of your size, which he writes about in“The Elephant in the Room: One Fat Man’s Quest to Get Smaller in a Growing America”(Simon & Schuster).

Arts  Health  

Your Housekeeper Knows Your Secrets

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Housekeepers get to know the intimate details of the people they serve – even when those same people barely know the names of those who clean their homes. Stephanie Land turned to housekeeping to make ends meet, and she joins host Krys Boyd to talk about her relationship to the people she served. Her new memoir is called“Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother’s Will to Survive”(Hachette).

Arts  Health  

Making Sense Of ‘Mercy’ Killings

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Assisted suicide administered by a spouse is a gut-wrenching choice that some senior citizens feel is their only option. Ann Neumann joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how some people view the act as merciful while others see it as the ultimate betrayal.She writes aboutthe topic for Harper’s magazine.

Arts  Health  

Designing For Disability

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Over the last 50 years, America has worked to convert the built world into an accessible one by adding crosswalks for the visually impaired, ramps for those in wheelchairs and countless other upgrades. Bess Williamson, associate professor of art history, theory and criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how design has evolved as it attempts to accommodate all users, which she writes about in“Accessible America: A History of Disability and Design”(NYU Press).

Arts  Health  

Embracing A Queer Identity Early

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Today’s youth have more resources to explore their identities than any previous generation. Cal State San Marcos sociologist Mary Robertson joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how young people are exploring their sexual and gender identities, which she writes about in “Growing Up Queer: Kids and the Remaking of LGBTQ Identity” (NYU Press).

Arts  Health  

The Future Is Fiber – And The U.S. Is Falling Behind

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The expanded use of fiber-optic connections has opened up new possibilities to health care, education, retail and other fields. Harvard Law professor Susan Crawford joins host Krys Boyd to explain why we need to approach fiber with an increased urgency or risk falling behind other developed nations. Her new book is called“Fiber: The Coming Tech Revolution – And Why America Might Miss It”(Yale).

Arts  Health  

The Case For Holding A Grudge

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Sophie Hannah is a champion grudge-holder – a distinction she’s come to appreciate. She joins host Krys Boyd to explain how grudges can actually be good for us if we think of them in the right context. Her new book is called“How to Hold a Grudge: From Resentment to Contentment – the Power of Grudges to Transform Your Life”(Scribner).

Arts  Health  

Alt Medicine And The Will To Heal

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Acupuncture, yoga and other alternative therapies have helped people worldwide with chronic conditions. Yet the scientific community struggles to understand how these holistic approaches to healing work. Melanie Warner joins host Krys Boyd to talk about why an increasing number of patients are turning away from science – and about how the medical field is engaging with alternative medicine. Her new book is called“The Magic Feather Effect: The Science of Alternative Medicine and the Surprising Power of Belief”(Scribner).

Arts  Health  

Why Chimps Can Be Lazy But We Can’t

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If apes and monkeys are some of our closest animal kingdom cousins, why is it that they can sit around all day and be perfectly healthy and we cannot? Duke University evolutionary anthropologist Herman Pontzer joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how the same drive that led us to leave other species behind is the same thing that’s now negatively affecting our health. His story“Humans Evolved to Exercise”appears in the Scientific American.

Arts  Health  

Nuclear Accidents: Not If But When

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The head of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is charged with keeping Americans safe from a nuclear disaster. It’s a post Greg Jaczko once held, and he joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the difficulty of running an agency that has less political power than the industry it oversees. He writes about his experience in “Confessions of a Rogue Nuclear Regulator” (Simon & Schuster).

Arts  Health  

Unpacking Tornillo

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About 6,000 children passed through the tent city located in Tornillo, about 40 miles from El Paso. And after seven months in operation, the last child left earlier this month. Tanvi Misra joins host Krys Boyd to tell the story of the camp – how it ended up there, and how it came to such an abrupt end – whichshe writes aboutfor CityLab.

Arts  Health  

The IRS Has Bigger Problems Than Your Tax Returns

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As the government shutdown enters its fifth week, many Americans are wondering if they will receive their tax returns this year. Paul Kiel joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how the IRS has actually been withering away before our eyes for nearly a decade, providing less revenue for the government and less oversight for corporations. His story“How the IRS was Gutted”– written with Jesse Eisinger – was reported for ProPublica.

Arts  Health  

Millennials: Burned Out Already?

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Millennials are increasingly claiming to be burned out by work and everyday life. Anne Helen Petersen is one of them, and she joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how her generation has internalized the idea that in our digital world, we should be working all the time. Her essay “How Millennials Became the Burnout Generation” appears on BuzzFeed News.

Arts  Health  

Appalachia’s Silent Killer

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For decades, government regulators have known about toxic mine dust that is killing coal miners in Appalachia – and have done little to address the problem. That’s according to a new joint Frontline-NPR investigation. Howard Berkes worked on the report, and he joins host Krys Boyd to tell the stories of miners dying from dirty lungs. The Frontline episode “Coal’s Deadly Dust” airs tonight on PBS stations.

Arts  Health  

I Fell In Love With A Con Artist

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Imagine that the person you loved – the person you planned to spend the rest of your life with – wasn’t who you thought they were. That’s what happened to Abby Ellin, who joins host Krys Boyd to talk about what it’s like to have your life turned upside down by a duplicitous partner, which she writes about in “Duped: Double Lives, False Identities, and the Con Man I Almost Married” (PublicAffairs). 

Arts  Health  

Black Millennials And A Dream Deferred

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Many black millennials have watched as their parents and grandparents faced the reality that the American Dream was just out of their grasp no matter how far they reached. Reniqua Allen joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how this generation is rethinking what it means to make it, which she writes about in“It Was All a Dream: A New Generation Confronts the Broken Promise to Black America”(Bold Type Books).

Arts  Health  

What Happens If We Don’t Turn The Other Cheek

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Our laws are fairly accepting when it comes to the use of violence in cases of self-defense. Things are less clear when it comes to defending yourself against officers of the law. Georgetown University professor Jason Brennan joins host Krys Boyd to make the case that we should rethink the immunity granted to those whose job is to protect us. His essay “When Nonviolence Isn’t Enough” appears in Reason magazine.

Arts  Health  

What Trump Can Do In A State Of Emergency

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President Trump said, “I would almost say definitely,” when asked if he is willing to bypass Congress and declare a state of emergency to build the border wall. Elizabeth Goitein, co-director of the Liberty and National Security Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the powers that open up to presidents who declare states of emergency, which she writes about in her article “What the President Could Do If He Declares a State of Emergency” for The Atlantic.

Arts  Health  

Memes To An End: The Power Of Digital Culture

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Internet memes can seem pretty trivial (Grumpy Cat, anyone?). But when used correctly, they can actually tap into the zeitgeist in a way that connects like-minded people across the globe. An Xiao Mina joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how memes, emojis and other pieces of internet culture connect people offline, which she writes about in “Memes to Movements: How the World’s Most Viral Media is Changing Social Protest and Power” (Beacon Press).

Arts  Health  

What Journalism Does For The Arts

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In the last decade, newspapers and other publications have drastically cut the number of arts and culture writers they employ. This hour, host Krys Boyd talks with a panel of critics, artists and journalism teachers about the relationship between an arts community and the media and how it’s changed in an era of consolidation and social media.

Arts  Health  

Why America Still Needs The Rest Of The World

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During the Cold War, America had a number of allies ready to join us in the fight against communism. Foreign Affairs magazine editor Gideon Rose joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how these relationships have shifted and softened since those days when the mission was very clear, the subject of his essay “The Fourth Founding: The United States and the Liberal Order.”

Arts  Health  

The Long, Strange History of Parenting Advice

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New parents often bring home their new bundles of joy and immediately discover that when it comes to parenting the advice is limitless and often conflicting. Jennifer Traig – a mother herself – joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how parenting advice has evolved over the decades – and why there are still so many unresolved questions. Her new book is called “Act Natural: A Cultural History of Misadventures In Parenting” (Ecco).

Arts  Health  

When We Talk Ourselves Out Of The Truth

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We live in an age when the truth feels more malleable than ever. James Owen Weatherall, professor of logic and philosophy of science at the University of California, Irvine, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the social and psychological factors that lead some to create their over versions of the truth. His new book – written with Cailin O’Connor – is called “The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread” (Yale University Press).

Arts  Health  

Rethinking How We Treat Depression

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More than 250 million people worldwide suffer from depression – and yet treatment has changed very little in the last few decades. University of Cambridge psychiatry professor Edward Bullmore joins host Krys Boyd to talk about possible links between depression, stress and inflammation. His new book is called “The Inflamed Mind: A Radical New Approach to Depression” (Picador).

Arts  Health  

How Middle School Grades Boys

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The preteen years for kids can be a juncture point in which some will continue a path toward maturity while others will leave their once-sweet selves behind. Ellen McCarthy joins host Krys Boyd to talk specifically about how middle school affects boys. Her story,“Being a Boy: Ages 11 and 12”– written with Amy Joyce – appeared recently in the Washington Post.

Arts  Health  

For Polite Conversation, Try The Internet

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Between Twitter and the comments section, the Internet can seem like a place where polite discussion goes to die.  Antonio García Martínez joins host Krys Boyd to turn that narrative on its head. His story “Used Wisely, the Internet Can Actually Help Public Discourse” appears in Wired magazine.

Arts  Health  

The Other O’Keeffe Sister

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Ida O’Keeffe was an accomplished artist in her own right – a distinction that her more famous sister, Georgia, worked diligently to cover up. Sue Canterbury, Pauline Gill Sullivan Associate Curator of American Art at the Dallas Museum of Art, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about Ida’s underappreciated work, which has only recently gained attention. The exhibition “Ida O’Keeffe: Escaping Georgia’s Shadow” is on view at the Dallas Museum of Art through Feb. 24.

Arts  Health  

The High Cost Of Misdemeanors

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Misdemeanors by definition are relatively minor crimes. UC-Irvine law professor Alexandra Natapoff joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how these infractions often tip vulnerable populations into poverty once the legal machine kicks in. Her new book is called “Punishment Without Crime: How Our Massive Misdemeanor System Traps the Innocent and Makes America More Unequal” (Basic Books).

Arts  Health  

He Came For The Coffee (And Stayed For The War)

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As a 24-year-old, Mokhtar Alkhanshali left his life in San Francisco to explore the rich history of coffee farming in his ancestral home of Yemen. And it wasn’t until he arrived that he learned just how difficult it is to leave a country at war. Dave Eggers tells the story in“The Monk of Mokha”(Vintage Books), and Alkhanshali joins host Krys Boyd to talk about his experiences.

Arts  Health  

How Cancer Doctors Are Tailoring Treatment

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Standard treatment for cancer and other diseases involves diagnosing the problem and following a protocol. Science journalist Fran Smith joins host Krys Boyd to talk about a new way of treating disease called precision medicine, in which prevention, diagnosis and treatment are targeted to a patient’s unique biochemical makeup. She writes about the practice for National Geographic magazine.

Arts  Health  

Losing My Religion

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Jessica Wilbanks grew up in the Pentecostal church – a life she left behind at 16. She joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how her decision alienated her from her fundamentalist parents – and about the difficult process of charting her own spiritual path, which she writes about in“When I Spoke in Tongues: A Story of Faith and its Loss”(Beacon Press).

Arts  Health  

A Lesson In Texas Mythology

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W.F. Strong is beloved by public radio listeners for his popular “Stories from Texas” segment that airs on The Texas Standard. He joins guest host John McCaa to tell some tales – some tall, some not – and to talk about the mythology that surrounds the Lone Star State. His new book is called “Stories from Texas: Some of Them Are True” (Great Texas Line Press).

Arts  Health  

How We’re Still Funding The Civil War

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As American cities debate what to do with Confederate monuments, many will be surprised to learn that over the last decade, taxpayers have spent $40 million on the preservation of these statues and Confederate heritage organizations. Brian Palmer of the Investigative Fund joins guest host John McCaa to talk about these links to America’s troubled past and the ongoing conversation about their future. His story “The Cost of the Confederacy,” written with Seth Freed Wessler, is a collaboration between Smithsonian magazine and The Investigative Fund at the Nation Institute.

Arts  Health  

Texans Of The Year

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Each year, The Dallas Morning News looks back at the previous 12 months to determine the Texan of the Year. Elizabeth Souder and Brendan Miniter of the paper’s editorial board join guest host John McCaa to talk about the finalists, which include Dallas Mavericks CEO Cynt Marshall, the Austin bombing investigators, AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson and this year’s winner, Laura Bush.

Arts  Health  

A Playwright Remembers His Border Childhood

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Octavio Solis grew up in El Paso before becoming one of America’s most accomplished Latino playwrights. He joins host Krys Boyd to tell stories of his younger days along the Rio Grande – and how they influenced his life and work. He gathers these vignettes in his new memoir, “Retablos: Stories From a Live Lived Along the Border” (City Lights Publishers).

Arts  Health  

When Slavery Uproots Your Family Tree

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The digitization of records and their availability online has offered unprecedented access for amateur genealogists. Kenyatta D. Berry, host of “Genealogy Roadshow” on PBS, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about using this information to build a story of your family – and about how collecting this data is still challenging for descendants of slaves. Her new book is called “The Family Tree Toolkit: A Comprehensive Guide to Uncovering Your Ancestry and Researching Genealogy” (Skyhorse Publishing).

Arts  Health  

How We’ve Used Anne Frank

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Anne Frank is the most well-known of the 6 million Jews who died in the Holocaust because of the diary she kept during her young life. Dara Horn joins us to talk about what Frank’s writings say about the person she would have become – and to introduce us to another Holocaust writer with a very different perspective. Horn’s story “Becoming Anne Frank” appears in Smithsonian magazine.

Arts  Health  

Estrangement As Salvation

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Estrangement is a situation that touches parents and their children, siblings and even lifelong friends. Harriet Brown joins us to talk about the building blocks that eventually create walls between loved ones – and about her fractured relationship with her own mother. Brown’s new book is called “Shadow Daughter: A Memoir of Estrangement” (Da Capo Press).

Arts  Health  

Gene Editing As A Cure For Deafness

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Researchers are currently testing a form of gene editing on mice that could hold the cure for many people born deaf. Science writer Dina Fine Maron joins host Krys Boyd to explain a fascinating procedure in which edited genes are attached to a virus and snuck by the immune system, which she writes about in the December issue of Scientific American.

Arts  Health  

The Many Ways Presidents Leave The White House

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With Democrats set to take control of the U.S. House of Representatives in January, some are already banging the drum for impeachment hearings for President Trump. David Priess, who served in both the Bill Clinton and George W. Bush White Houses, joins host Krys Boyd to take a historical look at presidential removal. His new book is called “How to Get Rid of a President: History’s Guide to Removing Unpopular, Unable, or Unfit Chief Executives” (PublicAffairs).

Arts  Health  

The Surprising Future Of American Jews

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American Jews have established themselves in virtually every facet of American life. And that integration opens up a new set of challenges. Harvard Law professor Robert H. Mnookin joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how intermarriage, decreased religious observance and varying views on Israel are threatening American Jewish identity. His new book is called “The Jewish American Paradox: Embracing Choices in a Changing World” (PublicAffairs).

Arts  Health  

Rethinking Recycling

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The United States recycles about 34 percent of its waste – a number that hasn’t increased much in decades. Beth Porter, climate and recycling director for Green America, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about recycling strategies for both individuals and municipalities, which she writes about in “Reduce, Reuse, Reimagine: Sorting Out the Recycling System” (Rowman & Littlefield).

Arts  Health  

Want To Kill The Middle Class? Try Tariffs

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Earlier this month, the United States and China called a temporary truce in the countries’ months-long trade war, though difficult negotiations are required for the peace to hold. Matthew Rooney, managing director of the Bush Institute-SMU Economic Growth Initiative, joins host Krys Boyd to make the case that excessive tariffs raise prices, kill jobs and inhibit innovation, which he writes about in the current issue of The Catalyst.

Arts  Health  

Why Your Grandma Says That

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Every weekend, Martha Barnett and Grant Barrett take a deep dive into the nuances of how we communicate with each other on their public radio show “A Way With Words.” They join us to talk about what they’ve learned about the regional and generational differences in how we talk – and to talk with listeners about their own language curiosities.

Arts  Health  

Erasing The Link Between Art And Architecture

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Daniel Libeskind designed New York’s World Trade Center Redevelopment and many, many other significant projects around the world. He joins us to talk about his approach to architecture – and why he says anyone can do it. His new book on his life’s work is called “Edge of Order” (Clarkson Porter).

Arts  Health  

Who Or Whom? Who Cares.

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As much as our English teachers would like us to follow the laws of grammar, language has a way of developing organically. Lane Greene joins us to talk about how language evolves despite all those rules, which he writes about in “Talk on the Wild Side: Why Language Can’t Be Tamed” (Economist Books).

Arts  Health  

The Ethics Of Editing Babies

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Late last month, Chinese researcher He Jiankui opened a Pandora’s Box with his announcement that he’s edited the genes of twin girls. Science writer Ed Yong joins us to talk about how the prospect of designer babies has rocked the scientific community, which he writes about for The Atlantic.

Arts  Health  

How White Gatekeepers Restrain Black Thinkers

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In a new essay, Mychal Denzel Smith writes, “The white audience does not seek out black public intellectuals to challenge their worldview; instead they are meant to serve as tour guides through a foreign experience that the white audience wishes to keep at a comfortable distance.” Smith joins us to talk about how black writers from James Baldwin to Ta-Nehisi Coates consider the race of their readers – and about they can sometimes be muted by white gatekeepers – which he writes about in the current issue of Harper’s magazine.

Arts  Health  

Trading A C-Suite For A Cop’s Beat

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As enforcers of the law, police officers are charged with leading exemplary lives – even as they interact with criminals on a daily basis. Sarah Cortez has spent two decades as a beat cop – a profession she took up after a career climbing the corporate ladder. She joins host us to talk about her personal reflections of what it means to protect and serve, the subject of “Tired, Hungry, Standing in One Spot for Twelve Hours: Essential Cop Essays” (Texas Review Press).

Arts  Health  

Why We Should Be Talking About Rape

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As a 17-year-old living in Mumbai, Sohaila Abdulali survived a gang rape. And in the decades since, she’s worked to chart a new path to healing. Abdulali joins us to talk about whether or not rape is a life-defining moment – and if we can create a world without these kinds of assaults. Her new book is called “What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape” (The New Press).

Arts  Health  

What Happens After Exoneration

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When a prisoner is exonerated, a wrong has been righted. Lara Bazelon joins us to talk about how these victories can actually lead to longer periods of despair for both the wrongfully convicted and the victim who can no longer claim justice. Bazelon’s new book is called “Rectify: The Power of Restorative Justice After Wrongful Conviction” (Beacon Press), and this conversation is part of the KERA series One Crisis Away: The Price of Prison.

Arts  Health  

George Saunders’ Fable For Adults

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George Saunders received critical acclaim – and a Man Booker Prize – for his 2017 novel “Lincoln in the Bardo.” He joins us to talk about his latest work, “Fox 8” (Random House), a darkly comedic short story of a fox who learns to speak.

Arts  Health  

Sons Of The Founding Fathers

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Most Americans have at least a passing familiarity with George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and their contemporaries. UT-Austin historian H.W. Brands joins us to talk about the men who took the baton from the Founding Fathers and put their ideas to work. Brands is the author of “Heirs of the Founders: The Epic Rivalry of Henry Clay, John Calhoun and Daniel Webster, the Second Generation of American Giants” (Doubleday).

Arts  Health  

Your Brain On Art

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A visit to a museum can provoke a long list of questions: How does this piece make me feel? Is what I’m looking at any good? And who gets to decide what makes something a work of art? Ellen Winner, director of the Arts and Mind Lab at Boston College, joins us to walk through these questions and many others, which she tackles in “How Art Works: A Psychological Exploration” (Oxford).

Arts  Health  

The World’s Most Violent Places Are Not At War

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Colombia and Mexico regularly see their share of violent activity – even though they aren’t engaged in a formal war. Rachel Kleinfeld of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace joins us to talk about how corruption, political conflict and state brutality combine to create unsafe places around the globe, which she writes about in “A Savage Order: How the World’s Deadliest Countries Can Forge a Path to Security” (Pantheon).

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You Love It When People Fail – Here’s Why

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When that jerk at work spills coffee all over his shirt, we laugh, right? Turns out that’s a natural – and common – response. Tiffany Watt Smith joins us to talk about why we find perverse pleasure in the pain of others. Her new book is called “Schadenfreude: The Joy Of Another’s Misfortune” (Little, Brown Spark)

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Meet The Women Who Fought The Taliban

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In the battle against the Taliban, women serving in the armed forces have played a key role in circumventing a patriarchal society to gather information from Afghan women. Eileen Rivers of USA Today – and a veteran of Operation Desert Storm – joins us to introduce us to a trio of military women who served in what are known as Female Engagement Teams. Her new book is called “Beyond the Call: Three Women on the Front Lines in Afghanistan” (Da Capo).

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Swimming With Cephalopods

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Cephalopods are amazing creatures – capable of complex learning, chameleon-like fluidity and lighting quick dexterity. Mike Vecchione, director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries National Systematics Laboratory, joins us to talk about these wonders of the sea, which he writes about in “Octopus, Squid & Cuttlefish: A Visual, Scientific Guide to the Oceans’ Most Advanced Invertebrates” (University of Chicago Press).

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Being Amy Sedaris

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Amy Sedaris began making us laugh with her television series “Strangers with Candy” and is still cracking us up with her role on “BoJack Horseman.” She joins us to talk about her career in the funny business. Sedaris is the recipient of this year’s Ernie Kovacs award from Dallas VideoFest.

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In Defense Of Puns

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A snappy comeback, delivered with just the right amount of zing, can make you the life of the party or the hero of the office. James Geary joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the importance of wit in everyday life, and to make the case that puns – yes puns! – may be the highest form of wit. His new book is called “Wit’s End: What Wit Is, How It Works, and Why We Need It” (W.W. Norton & Co.).

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Examining America’s Founding Truths

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Thomas Jefferson said that the American experiment depended on three truths. Harvard historian Jill Lepore joins host Krys Boyd to talk about political equality, natural rights and the sovereignty of the people through a 21stCentury lens. Her new book is called “These Truths: A History of the United States” (W.W. Norton and Co).

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Surprise: Placebos Are Effective

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Clinical trials include a placebo to guard against misleading results. So what should we make of cases when placebo groups also improve? Gary Greenberg joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the possibility that the placebo effect might actually provide real results, which he wrote about recently for The New York Times magazine.

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Growing Up Queer: What Kids Need To Know

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Kids questioning their sexual identity have more resources than ever. Still, the road to clarity can be arduous. Kelly Madrone joins host Krys Boyd to talk about ways to help struggling children and their parents along that path. Madrone’s book is called “LGBTQ: The Survival Guide for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Teens” (Free Spirit Publishing).

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Rape Cases Are Being Closed – Not Solved

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The criminal justice system has many ways of clearing rape cases. But a case being closed isn’t the same as justice served. Newsy reporter Mark Greenblatt joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how police departments across the country are using a federal guideline to bury these criminal cases,which he writes about for ProPublica.

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The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly Of Identity Politics

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With white nationalists, anti-immigrant populists, liberal academics and many other fractious groups, identity politics is having an outsized effect on the nation as a whole. Stanford University fellow Francis Fukuyama joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the need for different groups to feel as if they are heard – and the limits to that recognition – which he writes about in “Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux).

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Who Says You Can’t Have More Than One Religion?

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When someone has, say, a Jewish father and Christian mother, it’s common to inherit spiritual practices from each. Duane R. Bidwell of the Claremont School of Theology joins host Krys Boyd to talk about people who find it limiting to practice just one faith. His new book is called “When One Religion Isn’t Enough: The Lives of Spiritually Fluid People” (Beacon Press).

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Waiting In The Age Of Instant Gratification

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Some of the most unnerving times in our lives are when we’re waiting for news – good or bad. Jason Farman, director of the Design Cultures & Creativity Program at the University of Maryland, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how patience has been a virtue throughout history. His new book is called “Delayed Response: The Art of Waiting From the Ancient to the Instant World” (Yale University Press).

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The Many Facades Of Philip Johnson

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If you’ve ever visited the Fort Worth Water Gardens or Dallas’ Thanks-Giving Square, you can thank Philip Johnson. Dallas Morning News architecture critic Mark Lamster joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the designer’s influence on North Texas and the world, the subject of his book “The Man in the Glass House: Philip Johnson, Architect of the Modern Century” (Little, Brown and Company).

To get you ready for the show, check out Jerome Week’s review of “The Man in the Glass House” on Art&Seek and take a tour of Johnson’s North Texas highlights with Lamster over at dallasnews.com.

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To Infinity … And Beyond!

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Space is a subject that fascinates kids and adults alike. This hour, we’re revisiting some of our favorite conversations about the cosmos, talking about the significance of discovering liquid water on Mars, what we know about the origins of the sun and what researchers have learned from sending a satellite on a mission 3 billion miles from Earth.

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Thanksgiving Is A Made-Up Holiday (And That’s OK)

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By now, most adults know the first Thanksgiving didn’t quite go down the way we were taught in school. Anthropologist Jack David Eller joins us to talk about how American holidays and customs are largely borrowed from other cultures or created from myths. His new book is called “Inventing American Tradition: From the Mayflower to Cinco de Mayo” (Reaktion Books).

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How Travel Apps Can Steer You Wrong

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As the New York Times Frugal Traveler columnist, Seth Kugel visited more than 50 countries in search of rich experiences for the less-than-rich. He joins us to talk about why sticking to a limited budged can actually produce a more rewarding trip, which he writes about in “Rediscovering Travel: A Guide for the Globally Curious” (Liveright).

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Why Working Mothers Can’t Win

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Parenting can be particularly difficult for working mothers, seeing as that working fathers are usually just known as “fathers.” Amy Westervelt joins us to talk about her experiences balancing work and parenting, which included checking in with her boss from the maternity ward. Her new book is called “Forget Having It All: How America Messed Up Motherhood – and How to Fix It” (Seal).

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Americans Are Scared Of The Wrong Things

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With nuclear threats, natural disasters and social unrest, it feels like scary times, doesn’t it? Sociologist Barry Glassner joins us to talk about why our perception of these threats doesn’t line up with the reality of trouble striking. His best-selling book “The Culture of Fear: Why Americans Are Afraid of the Wrong Things” (Basic Books) has just been updated and re-released.

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Alone At The South Pole

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Two men – one American, one Brit – are each attempting to become the first person to cross Antarctica on foot unassisted. New Yorker staff writer David Grann joins us to talk about Henry Worsley, a British special forces officer who gave it a shot in 2015 (spoiler alert: he didn’t succeed). Grann tells the story in his new book, “The White Darkness” (Doubleday).

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Haunted By Mental Illness

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Lindsay Wong grew up in a family full of mental illness. But instead of seeking treatment, her grandmother and mother blamed their maladies on ghosts who haunted the living. Wong joins us to talk about how the stigma surrounding mental illness affected her loved ones, which she writes about in her memoir, “The Woo Woo: How I Survived Ice Hockey, Drug Raids, Demons, And My Crazy Chinese Family” (Arsenal Pulp Press).

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How Eggplants Have Sex

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The fruits, vegetables, legumes and other foods that wind up on our tables all have something in common: They made it there because of sex. University of California, Riverside genetics professor Norman C. Ellstrand joins us to talk about the mechanics of plant reproduction, which he writes about in “Sex on the Kitchen Table: The Romance of Plants and Your Food” (University of Chicago Press).

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Bring Back The Trust-Busters

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Some of our most important industries – banking, technology, pharmaceuticals – are controlled by just a handful of companies. Columbia University professor Tim Wu joins us to talk about the link between concentrated industrial influence and concentrated wealth, which he writes about in “The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age” (Columbia Global Reports).

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Fresh From The Lab: It’s Your Dinner

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Humanity approaches pets and even endangered species with kindness. Jacy Reese joins us to talk about how the next step in expanding our morality is to extend that same compassion to animals we raise for food. His new book is called “The End of Animal Farming: How Scientists, Entrepreneurs, and Activists are Building an Animal-Free Food System” (Beacon Press).

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Greed is Not Good – Here’s Why

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CEOs and company boards have a duty to maximize shareholder profits. Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post columnist Steven Pearlstein joins us to talk about how this mission has widened the American wealth gap – and about how a return to one of Adam Smith’s key principles could be the solution. His new book is called “Can American Capitalism Survive?: Why Greed is not Good, Opportunity is not Equal, and Fairness Won’t Make Us Poor” (St. Martin’s Press).